Prof. Markus Hainthaler, M.Sc. (Univ.) Dipl.-Ing. (FH)

  • Mechanische / Thermische / Chemische / Biologische Verfahrenstechnik
  • Anlagenplanung und -bau
  • Fluidmechanik, Wärme- und Stoffübertragung
  • Konstruktionslehre, Technisches Zeichnen
  • Lean Management, Prozessoptimierung

Professor

Stiftungsprofessur Fa. Schlagmann Poroton GmbH & Co. KG


Sprechzeiten

nach Vereinbarung


Zeitschriftenartikel
  • M. Izydor
  • Markus Hainthaler
  • U. Gaipl
  • B. Frey
  • E. Schlücker
Static and Dynamic, but not Pulsed High‐Pressure Treatment Efficiently Inactivates Yeast , vol40
  • 2017

DOI: 10.1002/ceat.201600290

Static high‐pressure (HP) treatment has become a powerful tool for preserving foodstuffs, allowing high inactivation rates and minimal adverse effects on valuable components. Due to HP maxima and batch mode conditions, it is restricted to high‐grade products. To overcome these restrictions, dynamic HP offers the possibility of a quasi‐continuous mode of operation. The effects of three different HP treatments (static, pulsed, and dynamic) on yeast were investigated. The inactivation efficiency and membrane damage increase with increasing pressure or pressure holding time. The cells do not show higher sensitivity to fast and repeated depressurization, and the number of pressure pulses plays only a minor role in inducing membrane damage. A form of programmed cell death could not be detected.
  • Angewandte Naturwissenschaften und Wirtschaftsingenieurwesen
  • NACHHALTIG
Zeitschriftenartikel
  • J. Stoltze
  • M. Izydor
  • Markus Hainthaler
  • P. Richter
  • E. Schlücker
  • M. Lebert
Euglena gracilis as a promising eukaryotic model system for fast detection of high pressure induced cell destruction , vol133
  • 2017

DOI: 10.1016/j.envexpbot.2016.09.008

High hydrostatic pressure (HHP) is a promising method for the inactivation of cells and enzymes in many applications (e.g. food industry, pharmaceutical industry, chemistry). The effects of various high-hydrostatic pressures (20 MPa, 50 MPa, 55 MPa, 60 MPa, 75 MPa, 100 MPa, 150 MPa, 200 MPa, 400 MPa) on the unicellular flagellate Euglena gracilis were determined: (a) life/dead staining with ethidium bromide (EtBr), (b) loss of flagellum, (c) movement behavior, (d) recovery after 7 d, (e) photosystem II quantum yield (Y(PSII)). Pressure was applied for 300 s at room temperature (pressure increment and decrement: 10 MPa s−1). The EC50 value of vitality (EtBr-positive cells) directly after pressure application was 109 MPa. Cell vitality was not impaired below 100 MPa. No recovery of cells after 7 d-cultivation in fresh medium was observed after pressure treatment above 100 MPa. Flagellum-based free swimming of cells was already impaired at pressures above 50 MPa, where some cells started metabolic movement behavior. From 75 MPa to 100 MPa all cells moved metabolically, while at higher-pressure all cells became immotile. In the pressure range between 75 MPa and 200 MPa, cells lost their flagellum. Interestingly, cells pressurized with 400 MPa retained their flagella. Directly after HHP-treatment EC50 of Y(PSII)-inhibition was about 101 MPa, after 6 h about 102 MPa. The use of fluorescence-based methods is considerably fast, easy and reliable. Because of the different easily recordable parameters, we believe that Euglena gracilis is a promising test organism to determine HHP-effects on eukaryotes. The effects on photosynthesis indicate impacts on intracellular membrane and protein complexes.
  • Angewandte Naturwissenschaften und Wirtschaftsingenieurwesen
  • NACHHALTIG
Zeitschriftenartikel
  • Markus Hainthaler
  • M. Izydor
  • E. Schlücker
Quasi-kontinuierliche Hochdruckbehandlung – Ein innovativer Prozess vereint hygienisches Design und Energieeffizienz , vol88
  • 2016

DOI: 10.1002/cite.201650252

  • Angewandte Naturwissenschaften und Wirtschaftsingenieurwesen
  • NACHHALTIG
Vortrag
  • Markus Hainthaler
  • M. Izydor
  • E. Schlücker
Quasi-kontinuierliche Hochdruckbehandlung – Ein innovatives Prozesskonzept schafft den Spagat zwischen Hygienischem Design und Energieeffizienz
  • 2016
  • Angewandte Naturwissenschaften und Wirtschaftsingenieurwesen
  • NACHHALTIG
Zeitschriftenartikel
  • M. Izydor
  • Markus Hainthaler
  • E. Schlücker
Hochdruckinaktivierung: Unterschiedliches Druckprofil – gleicher Zellschaden? , vol87
  • 2015

DOI: 10.1002/cite.201550038

  • Angewandte Naturwissenschaften und Wirtschaftsingenieurwesen
  • NACHHALTIG
Vortrag
  • Markus Hainthaler
  • E. Schlücker
  • N. Ebel
Quasi-continuous High Pressure Preservation – A novel reactor concept paves the way for large-scale processing
  • 2013
  • Angewandte Naturwissenschaften und Wirtschaftsingenieurwesen
  • NACHHALTIG
Zeitschriftenartikel
  • L. Ho
  • Markus Hainthaler
  • G. Newcombe
Using UV Spectroscopy and Molecular Weight Determinations to Investigate the Effect of Various Water Treatment Processes on NOM Removal: Australian Case Study , vol139
  • 2013

DOI: 10.1061/(ASCE)EE.1943-7870.0000596

Natural organic material (NOM) has been the focus of many studies because of its ability to compromise water treatment processes. This case study utilized ultraviolet (UV) spectroscopy and molecular weight distributions to investigate the impact of six water treatment processes (alum coagulation, magnetic ion exchange (MIEX) resin treatment, chlorination, ozonation, powdered activated carbon (PAC) adsorption, and biological sand filtration) on the removal of NOM from an Australia water source, Myponga Reservoir. Each of these processes displayed different effects on the concentration and character of NOM. The removal of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) and UV absorbance at 254 nm (UV254) by MIEX and the biological sand filter was shown to follow first-order kinetics with rate constants ranging from 9.0×10−8  s−1 (biological sand filter) to 6.3×10−5  s−1 (MIEX treatment). UV spectroscopic investigations showed the potential to predict the formation of disinfection by-products from chlorination with strong correlations (R2 of 0.96) observed between the formation of trihalomethanes and the differential UV absorbance at 265 nm. Ozonation and biological sand filtration also appeared to target NOM absorbing at 265 nm. Molecular weight distribution analyses showed MIEX treatment to be the most effective single process in achieving high removals of a wide molecular weight range of NOM, consistent with the high removals of DOC and UV254 (up to 90% and 80% removal, respectively). The combination of alum and PAC, treatment options which exist at the majority of Australian water treatment plants, also proved effective for high NOM removal over a wide range of molecular weights, where alum effectively removed high molecular weight compounds, and PAC effectively removed low molecular weight compounds. This study has demonstrated that valuable information can be gained through simple manipulation of UV absorbance and molecular weight distribution data, which could be beneficial to water utilities in not only facilitating the selection of treatment processes when commissioning WTPs, but also optimizing existing treatment processes for effective NOM removal.
  • Angewandte Naturwissenschaften und Wirtschaftsingenieurwesen
  • NACHHALTIG
Vortrag
  • Markus Hainthaler
  • N. Ebel
  • E. Schlücker
Dynamic High Pressure Treatment – Von der dynamischen Hochdruckinaktivierung zum quasi-kontinuierlichen Sterilisationsprozess
  • 2012
  • Angewandte Naturwissenschaften und Wirtschaftsingenieurwesen
  • NACHHALTIG
Vortrag
  • E. Ebel
  • Markus Hainthaler
  • E. Schlücker
Dynamic High Pressure Treatment – Improving the Inactivation of Microorganisms and Pathogens
  • 2011
  • Angewandte Naturwissenschaften und Wirtschaftsingenieurwesen
  • NACHHALTIG
Vortrag
  • N. Ebel
  • Markus Hainthaler
  • E. Schlücker
Dynamic high pressure treatment (dHP) as a new approach towards inactivation of microorganisms and pathogens Posterpräsentation
  • 2010
  • Angewandte Naturwissenschaften und Wirtschaftsingenieurwesen
  • NACHHALTIG

Projekte

KERATON - Innovative Produktionsmethoden von keramischen Dämmmaterialien (BMWi, Fkz 03ET1623A)


Labore

stv. Laborleiter "Chemie" am Sustainability Innovation Lab Center (ECRI)


Kernkompetenzen

Verfahrens- und Anlagentechnik


Vita

seit 03/2018

European Campus Rottal-Inn (Technische Hochschule Deggendorf)

Professor Verfahrenstechnik und Anlagenbau

03/2010 – 07/2017

Friedrich-Alexander-Universität, Erlangen

Lehrstuhl für Prozessmaschinen und Anlagentechnik Doktorand Thema: Quasi-Kontinuierliche Hochdruckkonservierung von Lebensmitteln

10/2007 – 03/2010

Friedrich-Alexander-Universität, Erlangen

M.Sc. Chemie- und Bioingenieurwesen Vertiefung: Prozesstechnik und Produktdesign

07/2005 – 10/2007

Wacker Chemie AG, Burghausen

Projektingenieur Projekt: Errichtung einer Reinstsiliciumanlage (Fast Track)

02/2004 – 06/2005

H&G Hegmanns Ingenieurgesellschaft mbH, Burghausen

Verfahrensingenieur

10/1998 – 12/2003

Georg-Simon-Ohm-Fachhochschule, Nürnberg

Dipl.-Ing.Verfahrenstechnik Vertiefung: Bioverfahrenstechnik